Sunday 28 April 2002

Dishmatique

DishmatiqueI’m not sure what this reveals about my personality but one of things I loved about being a photographer was having different camera systems, with all kinds of accessories that screwed or snapped together with satisfying clicks. Though not anywhere near as tactile, computers are similar: I have lots of SCSI, USB, and Firewire devices hanging off both my desktop and notebook PCs.

I like the Dishmatique washing up system for the same reason: not only does it have replaceable sponge/scouring heads, but you unscrew the cap on the end and fill the handle with dishwashing detergent, which the Dishmatique automatically dispenses as you clean!

Dishmatique replacement headsEach scouring head has a kind of bayonet mount with a safety catch to ensure that the head cannot work its way loose—no matter how vigorously you scrub.

Best of all, two kinds of interchangeable sponge/scouring heads are available:

  • Non-Scratch White (for delicate china and non-stick cookware) and
  • Heavy Duty Green (for stubbon stains and cast-iron pots and pans).

Given that the Dishmatique is made in England, it amazes me that a Google search on “Dishmatique” yields only two sites: Maria in Finland and Kron International in Sweden.

I can’t imagine facing a pile of dishes without my Dishmatiques (I have two, so that I don’t have to switch heads in mid-wash). I’ll be interested to hear if they’re available elsewhere in the world.

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Comments

Seperate green and white, is that like two leicas, one with a 35mm and the other an 85mm or is it b&w in one and colour in the other body?

Posted by Gerrit Fokkema on 28 April 2002 (Comment Permalink)

Snap! That's my bachelor washing up tool too.

Oh, and hello Gerritt, long time no see.

Posted by Allan Moult on 29 April 2002 (Comment Permalink)

Here in the UK, there are actually three scouring heads!

White
Orange
Green

The orange one is less abrasive than the green and not as smooth as the white.

I think they are also available in France.

Posted by Kevin Laurence on 30 April 2002 (Comment Permalink)

I actually use something very similar to this as well, although it doesn't have a cool name like "Dishmatique." I think it's called "spongey-thing with the handle."

Posted by Shannon on 30 April 2002 (Comment Permalink)

You are fucking disturbed.
Where do you buy them?

Posted by linda on 1 May 2002 (Comment Permalink)

Coles Supermarket at Broadway.

Posted by Jonathon Delacour on 1 May 2002 (Comment Permalink)

I like the idea of washing dishes with more or less clean hands. I live in Germany and I don't have the faintest clue where to get one of these "dishmatiques" (except at Coles Supermarket at Broadway, but I don't think that I will ever get there) Who can tell me? Maybe someone is willing to send me a box full of dishmatiques with replacement heads (after I sent the money, of course *g*).

Posted by Ralf on 12 May 2002 (Comment Permalink)

too lazy for the manual approach

Posted by zWWWer on 29 August 2002 (Comment Permalink)

Jonathan please would you send me any info onwho originally designed th eproduct and who holds the patent and wether it is internationally protected. I would like to bring the dishmatique to my country if possible.
Thank you any help on this matter would be greatly appreciated .
Gary

Posted by Gary on 29 March 2003 (Comment Permalink)

I love this deisgn which is simple but absolutely useful.
What a pity that it is not available in Asian countries? Why?
Hong Kong people must like it very much because we don't have a dishwasher at home.

I bought two sets with 9 heads from Perth (Australia) two years ago.
Now, I'm still using it everyday. But I have only 3 heads left.
I'm worrying where can I buy this besides Australia?

UK? Is this common in any super-market in UK?

Please, if anyone know the producer of this dishmatique,
contact me on jesseeee@netvigator.com
I'd love to introduce this to Asian countries.

Posted by Jessica Chan on 24 June 2003 (Comment Permalink)

This discussion is now closed. My thanks to everyone who contributed.

© Copyright 2007 Jonathon Delacour